Tag Archives: writing

New horror project: feedback

28 May , 2009,
Chip Street
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one comments

Well, we’ve gotten feedback from two of our first-draft readers so far.

It was great!! Wow. You guys really put some work into this piece and it shows. Excellent job on many levels … I was intrigued, involved and enjoyed the ride. Felt like a mash-up between Gremlins and The Descent. I don’t think you’ll have any problems getting the right people behind this script!

Of course I lead with the most positive points, and leave out the dumb things he said like “make it better” and whatnot. :) Seriously, he gave us some great feedback, pointed out the weak spots, gave us direction for the second draft but overall, the review was pretty positive.

Then came:

I think it’s a great first draft. No real notes on structure, some scenes need to be a little more kinetic though.

Somewhat more reserved, as you can see. This reader is an asshole, obviously, and doesn’t realize just how groundbreaking this script is.

Read More…

WGA: Sundance screenwriters on writing for indies

14 May , 2009,
Chip Street
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Thanks to my good friend Jeff Palmer for this link:

WGA’s Angle On series features a video interview of several screenwriters at Sundance, discussing the constraints and advantages of writing for indie film, and some of the best advice they’ve gotten in their careers.

New horror project: day twelve writing

12 May , 2009,
Chip Street
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one comments

Excellent progress today. Knocked out 5.5 pages.

We’ve really turned a corner with our main female lead… she started out as damaged goods with an asshole husband, and is now in charge of that relationship and really seems to see him for what he is.

We’ve stitched up the gaping head wound, gathered supplies in preparation for the next day’s trek through the woods, and….

Had the creatures attack and kill the a-hole, and the cabin is on fire.

Now the creatures are clearly a mortal threat, our shelter is disappearing, and it’s dark out.

In pretty good shape page-count wise…

We’re on page 54. Outline says 55. Right on track.

Hours (chip): 58

We're in the Nicholl…

1 May , 2009,
Chip Street
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one comments

Well, I’ve submitted two screenplays to the Nicholl Fellowship competition.

Grampa Was A Superhero, written with Sean Meehan,

and

Rocket Summer, my first feature.

Grampa is our first feature collaboration, and it’s received very positive feeback from readers. It’s a strong story with a heartwarming family appeal.

Rocket Summer was tied up in an option for two years shortly after it was completed, so I kept it out of any competitions. Now it’s freed up, and I’m excited to see what happens.

JULY – Quarterfinalists announced.

AUGUST – Semifinalists announced.

OCTOBER (early) – Finalists announced.

OCTOBER (late) – Winners announced.

I’ll be pleased to make it to the Quarterfinals, completely satisfied with the Semis.

Send good feelings!

New horror project: day nine writing

30 Apr , 2009,
Chip Street
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Another story meeting.

We’ve completed the story up to the point where the creatures are to be revealed, and our characters have to take off on a dangerous journey through the mountains while being pursued.

Today, we wanted to review the outline, and add more clear roadblocks to their juggernaut trip (is that redundant?) to create explicit points of conflict escalating toward the final resolution. We had a general escalation outlined, but wanted to make it better defined before starting the writing.

We’re going to create three challenges. We’ve chosen two and will find the third tomorrow. It’s important that the incidents feel organic to the story, driven by, resolved by, or directly affect elements already present in our mythos or in our characters. No lame “oh, I fell, I twisted my ankle!” moments.

More importantly, we had one major plot point to nail down. We’ve got two primary male characters… dude A is a douchebag, dude B is a good guy. The original plan was to have dude douchebag killed early in the juggernaut, and dude good guy die later, near the end. Dude douchebag was intended to be a somewhat shallow character, not quite a red-shirt, but not someone people would be connected to – or more to the point, he would be someone whose death people might cheer.

However, he’s grown, since we let him choose his voice to a certain extent, and has become more defined and complex. That’s great… he’s a multi-layered douchebag.

Our good guy is still complex… a nice guy with a troubled marriage (though he doesn’t know it), who just wanted to have some quiet time to write (a purposeful cliche – or homage) who has been royally screwed by his best friend and business partner (dude douchebag).

Neither of these guys is going to make it out alive… the overall goal is to have our primary woman character develop into a stronger person over the adventure… to become a hero a-la Ripley.

She’s about to be sent on a cross-country forest trek to (hopefully) safety, pursued by beasties, with two other women, and one of these two guys. Both of the other women are rather duplicitous and can’t be trusted either. They’re just more emotionally accessible than dude douchebag.

So here’s the question… do we want to kill off the douchebag character so early now that he’s become more interesting, and have our audience watch the good guy character make the trip through the forest? Or kill off our good guy, and have our audience watch the bad guy character make the trip?

Are we (and our story, and our characters, and our audience) better served by sending our growing hero through the woods with two other women and a douchebag guy? Or with two other women and a good guy?

We’ve made our decision. We’ll begin writing it next week.

What would you do?

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