Tag Archives: writing

tweet the meat

21 Jul , 2009,
Chip Street
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2 comments

tweet-the-meatYup, the Tweet The Meat submission I sold ran today. I promised I’d let ya know.

It’s right here.

Or here:

The kettle screamed. “Tea time,” she chirped, steaming pot in gloved hand. “Sugar?” He couldn’t answer with the funnel taped in his mouth.

Lemme know what ya think.

sold a twitter story to "tweet the meat"

16 Jul , 2009,
Chip Street
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3 comments

Twitter is giving rise to all kinds of creative applications, including a few ‘zines. Along with PicFic and escarp, there’s the horror focused ‘zine Tweet The Meat, which states: “No serials. No unfinished stories. You must scare us in 140 characters or less. Are you up to the challenge?”

Each week the theme is different… you’ll have to follow them on Twitter at: @tweetthemeat to get the weekly theme.

I submitted to this week’s theme: “HOT”. I sent three submissions. Only one was accepted. Tweet The Meat gets first online rights. After that I’ll be able to post it here for you non-tweets to see.

But here are the two that weren’t accepted:

He awoke to stifling heat. Couldn’t turn. Tried to sit but found the ceiling in front of his face. The furnace’s roar drowned his screams.

The grille sizzled under her wicked palms as she wept at the red crib sheet, but her hands still screamed mercilessly for baby back ribs.

I like the second of those better. 140 characters ain’t much room, but it forces your creativity. They definitely chose the best of the three though. Start following @tweetthemeat on Twitter right now to see it within the next week. Or check back here later.

Tweet The Meat is a paying ‘zine — one dollar per accepted submission. So technically, this is a sale for me. But a buck, sent to me through PayPal, after PayPal takes their cut, ain’t much. I asked Tweet The Meat to donate my dollar to a cancer, environmental or animal rights organization.

Cuz that’s just the kind of guy I am.

how do you get an agent?

15 Jul , 2009,
Chip Street
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2 comments

This is a great read, particularly as I’m just undertaking this next step myself (trying to find an agent or manager).

Part of the question I’m struggling with is whether it’s better at this point in my (nascent) career to go for agency or management… I haven’t quite decided on that yet.

But nevertheless, good essays on either process are always helpful.

This one, by Daniel Petrie, Jr. (BEVERLY HILLS COP, THE BIG EASY, SHOOT TO KILL, TURNER & HOOCH, TOY SOLDIERS, and IN THE ARMY NOW) includes not only his insights but those of a panel of agents from CAA, ICM, UTA and others. And in general, the consensus is that the old “query letter and SASE” path just isn’t what works anymore.

Let me assert that in twenty years of paid, professional experience in the motion picture industry (true, I include my summer as a movie theater usher to reach that figure) I have never heard the terms ‘query letter’ or ‘SASE’ used by another paid professional.

I’m not saying letters like that never work. Just that they almost never work. But wait — even if the odds are a million to one against, am I saying you shouldn’t even try? Yes. I am saying that. There is a better way. It’s more difficult, but better.

Check it out. It should both empower and intimidate you. But then, challenge is the father of all perseverance, yes?

on strong women characters

10 Jul , 2009,
Chip Street
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5 comments

strong_womanGiven the positive response to the female characters in Faeries, I’ve been giving some thought to the issue of writing strong women characters. As a man, I’m often told that it’s not possible for me to do so.

It is true that Lacey, the young girl in Rocket Summer, is probably the least complex character in the script (and that has been pointed out by some readers). But it’s also true that she is the glue for that group of dysfunctional friends… a caretaker, a realist, and a “person of interest” for a pair of boys with very fucked up home lives, one of whom lost his mother at a young age.

Unfortunately, to some, that makes her “stereotypical”… a character whose only job it is to fulfill the traditional “female” roles of mother, lover, nurturer. Me, I take exception to the word “only”. It’s important stuff. And she’s conflicted about it in the process, and seems to be setting aside some of her own desires to take on that role. For me, that’s a strong, flawed, and thus interesting female character.

Some people are never satisfied.

Read More…

grampa: prodco request

7 Jul , 2009,
Chip Street
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2 comments

grampa was a superhero movie posterYup, it’s true.

We’ve already got one script being considered by a reputable production company. Now we”ve got two irons in the fire.

Grampa Was A Superhero is being looked at by a production company in the Midwest… East… Southeast… Hell, I don’t know. Where’s Tennessee?

Anyway, the producer has a string of recognizable titles with a string of recognizable talents and a string of partnerships with a bushel of recognizable networks and… well, you get the idea.

Interestingly, this inquiry came to us mere hours after tweaking the logline and synopsis ever so slightly on InkTip. Correlation is not causation, but it makes one wonder. Hmmm. (That’s me, wondering.)

All the same caveats apply here as they do for the Faeries connection. No chicken counting prior to hatching. Likely as not nothing comes of it. But it’s the momentum that counts… nothing makes you more confident than knowing someone thought enough of your logline or synopsis to say “Sure, I’ll read that.”

Well, maybe a check.

But other than that, nothing.

I’m highly confident that one day soon we’ll look back at our naive excitement here and think “Ah, yes, those were the days, when a mere considerate nod from a mid-size prodco would make us swoon!”

But until then, I’ll take my jollies where I can, and savor the slightest attention.

Everyone who cares at all about us, cross your fingers. And tell a friend.

And join us on Facebook! Faeries page, Grampa page, Rocket Summer page.